Take a stand

The Equality Proclamation

On the 158th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, high-profile black leaders came together to announce the signing of the ‘EQUALITY PROCLAMATION,’ a proclamation in 2020, calling for the discrimination against black children in America to finally end.

Black Leaders who signed The Equality Proclamation

Dr. Alveda King
Alveda King Ministries
Catherine Davis
President, The Restoration Project
Dr. Johnny Hunter
President of L.E.A.R.N.
Walter Hoye II
Founder, Issues4Life Foundation
Clennard Childress
Founder Of BlackGenocide.Org
Stephen Broden
Founder, Fair Park Bible Fellowship Church
Amie Beth Shaver

The EQUALITY PROCLAMATION

Whereas on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-two, President Abraham Lincoln first signed the Emancipation Proclamation and was documented as saying, “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper. If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

Whereas in Montgomery, Alabama, exactly one hundred fifty-eight years later, on this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty, we the undersigned, with those words of Abraham Lincoln in our hearts, do hereby issue this Equality Proclamation on behalf of all the degraded and abused children of God.

Whereas we focus upon and emphasize this Equality Proclamation on behalf of black women and children in America because of the abortion industry’s disproportionate and discriminatory targeting of black women and children.

Whereas on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-two, President Abraham Lincoln first signed the Emancipation Proclamation and was documented as saying, “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper. If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

Whereas in Montgomery, Alabama, exactly one hundred fifty-eight years later, on this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty, we the undersigned, with those words of Abraham Lincoln in our hearts, do hereby issue this Equality Proclamation on behalf of all the degraded and abused children of God.

Whereas we focus upon and emphasize this Equality Proclamation on behalf of black women and children in America because of the abortion industry’s disproportionate and discriminatory targeting of black women and children.

Whereas on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-two, President Abraham Lincoln first signed the Emancipation Proclamation and was documented as saying, “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper. If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

Whereas in Montgomery, Alabama, exactly one hundred fifty-eight years later, on this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty, we the undersigned, with those words of Abraham Lincoln in our hearts, do hereby issue this Equality Proclamation on behalf of all the degraded and abused children of God.

Whereas we focus upon and emphasize this Equality Proclamation on behalf of black women and children in America because of the abortion industry’s disproportionate and discriminatory targeting of black women and children.

Whereas on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-two, President Abraham Lincoln first signed the Emancipation Proclamation and was documented as saying, “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper. If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

Whereas in Montgomery, Alabama, exactly one hundred fifty-eight years later, on this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty, we the undersigned, with those words of Abraham Lincoln in our hearts, do hereby issue this Equality Proclamation on behalf of all the degraded and abused children of God.

Whereas we focus upon and emphasize this Equality Proclamation on behalf of black women and children in America because of the abortion industry’s disproportionate and discriminatory targeting of black women and children.

Take a stand

    share:

    SUPPORT BLACK FAMILIES
    TO PROTECT THEIR BABIES…

    Our news

    PRESS RELEASE

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...
    PHOTOGRAPHS

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...
    LIFE LEGAL

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...
    PRESS RELEASE

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...
    PHOTOGRAPHS

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...
    LIFE LEGAL

    Over 20 million black babies Have been killed by abortion since 1973...

    Read more...

    FAQ

    Some important questions and facts
    around The Equality Proclamation

    What is the Equality Proclamation vs Equality Petition?

    The EQUALITY PROCLAMATION is a proclamation document signed by high-profile black leaders, who have come together to call for the discrimination against black children in America to finally end. Others, including you, can add your support to this cause.

    The EQUALITY PETITION is a petition filed in the Supreme Court of Alabama to end the chattel status of black babies in the womb and to afford them equal protection they are due under the Alabama Constitution

    What does the EQUALITY Petition do?

    The EQUALITY petition asks the State Supreme Court of Alabama to issue a writ of mandamus clarifying to elected officials in Alabama that the U.S. Constitution empowers them, and Alabama’s Constitution requires them, to take all actions necessary to prohibit discrimination against black women and against unborn black children in Alabama to ensure their equal protection under the law.

    Why are you not trying to protect other groups of babies (little girls, babies with down syndrome, and other disabilities) who are also impacted by higher proportional abortion rates?

    The Petitioners seek to leave no minority or any other group of children out of the scope of this petition. Petitioners hold that Alabama’s Constitution, homicide, wrongful death, and probate laws protect all children in Alabama from discrimination, and we seek to leave none of them out. This petition specifically focuses upon and emphasizes its plea on behalf of black women and children in Alabama because the abortion industry’s egregiously disproportionate and discriminatory practices toward black women and children are far more pronounced than in any other races. We believe that if America can open its eyes to this the most egregious discrimination in our nation’s history that it will also open our eyes to discrimination against any child for any reason.

    Won’t the U.S. Supreme Court in keeping with Roe v Wade just strike down a favorable decision on the EQUALITY Petition by the Alabama Supreme Court?

    It would be morally unconscionable, constitutionally indefensible, and without judicial or legal precedent for the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that the United States Constitution prohibits Alabama from legally preventing discrimination against black babies in Alabama. No U.S. Supreme Court decision since Dred Scott (including Roe and Casey) would prohibit states from legally preventing discrimination against these babies.

    Is there any real research showing that African-American babies have been historically and currently targeted by the abortion industry?

    If younger generations, especially young black Americans, ever view the documentary “Maafa 21” and see the truth just once, the abortion on demand crowd will never be able to lie to them again. If people, and especially the MEDIA, are truly interested in honestly understanding the plight of black children in this country’s history, they have a duty to watch this historic documentary.

    Isn’t it true that bringing this case all of a sudden during presidential election during this time of racial divide in our country makes your motivations more political than anything else?

    This issue is not new or all of a sudden. The EQUALITY PETITION was derived from a congressional bill called the “Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act” (PRENDA) which was first introduced in the United States Congress in 2012. The vast majority of the black leaders making this announcement today were personally and intrinsically involved in the original creation and promotion of PRENDA more than a decade ago. The bill prohibited abortion done solely on the basis of the sex or race of the baby, and it generated the introduction and/or passage of bills of the same concept in several states. Indiana’s version was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court which denied hearing the case until such time as its legal issues have been considered by additional Courts of Appeals. In that case, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said in his concurring opinion, “Whatever else might be said about Casey, it did not decide whether the Constitution requires States to allow eugenic abortions.”